A recent report from Bloomberg hints that the patience of movie studios is running out, leading at least some to move forward with talks with Apple and others about digital rentals being available just weeks after theatrical release. Those studios are, it seems, tired of trying to work with theater chains which have an active interest in blocking such efforts, and so may proceed with or without their blessing.

While this kind of new windowing is, as the story points out, unlikely to move forward until it has the blessing of the major chains, the studios may be hoping presenting this as a fait accompli may force theater owners to agree to something instead of blocking everything.

It’s going to be super-interesting to see how marketing campaigns may change to accommodate this new release pattern. There are two scenarios that come to mind.

Retain the Status Quo

The first option is that things remain more or less as they are. Studios right now are focused squarely on theatrical release being the central element of most all campaigns, with “buy tickets for opening weekend” being the most common call to action. There are slight variations on that here and there, but it’s a more or less universal approach. That’s usually followed up a few months later with a smaller paid campaign that’s built around the home video release, with TV commercials encouraging people to find the movie on Blu-ray and online ads leading to iTunes or other online platforms.

If the studios want to lessen the pain of the new reality for theaters, this is the approach they’ll maintain with their marketing.

One Campaign, Two Messages

If, however, the studios want to be a tad more antagonistic, they could start lacing in other CTAs, namely an additional message that says “…and then find it on iTunes three weeks later” or something along those lines. Whatever the specifics, it would clearly identify two options the audience can choose from: The theater now (depending, of course, on whether the film is even playing near them) or a premium VOD platform just a few weeks out.

That’s very different and essentially gives the audience an “out,” allowing them to shrug and opt to sit this one out, then make a fresh decision when it’s available for digital rental. It’s hard to see how this doesn’t immediately and substantially impact theater chains, which are already seeing lower tickets sales and foot traffic. It’s different even than the model used by Amazon Studios, which is much more along the lines of the traditional theatrical-centric marketing, making new mention of on-demand viewing until it’s actually available on Amazon Video.

Whatever happens, it’s clear that this discussion is coming to a head. It may not be one theater chains want to have, but studios obviously think this is an important step to take to shore up *their* business model, even if it impacts that of a long-time and valued partner.

Chris Thilk is a freelance writer and content strategist who lives in the Chicago suburbs.

One Comment on “Early Digital Releases Could Impact Marketing Efforts

  1. Pingback: Last Week on Cinematic Slant – Chris Thilk

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