cry macho – marketing recap

How Warner Bros. has sold the latest Clint Eastwood joint.

Cry Macho poster

Remember when Unforgiven was considered “late career Clint Eastwood? Now that revisionist Western, which opened up a wave of similar films reevaluating the “good guys wear white hats, bad guys wear black” model of previous decades, turns 30 next year but Eastwood has continued steadily working, especially as a director.

This week Cry Macho, the latest in which Eastwood both appears and directs, comes to HBO Max as well as theaters. Based on the 1975 novel of the same name by N. Richard Nash, the story follows Mike Milo (Eastwood), a retired rodeo rider who now breeds and trains horses. Milo is approached by his former boss Howard Polk (Dwight Yokam) to travel to Mexico to find and ultimately bring back Polk’s son Rafeal (Eduardo Minett) who is involved in an illegal cockfighting ring there.

announcements and casting

Warner Bros. announced the movie in October, 2020. One of the first, albeit very brief, looks at the movie came via an HBO Max promo touting the same day theatrical/streaming availability of WB’s 2021 lineup.

Eastwood’s multi-pronged role was part of the original announcement but the rest of the cast wasn’t confirmed until after production, which took place with Covid-19 safety protocols in place, was completed in mid-December of last year.

A release date was finally announced in March, 2021.

marketing campaign launches

The marketing campaign officially kicked off just over a month ago in early August with the release of first look stills showing Eastwood, Minett and others along with comments from the actor/director about getting older, directing during the pandemic and more. Another piece with more from Eastwood and a second round of photos came out shortly after that.

The movie’s one and only poster is so on the nose in terms of what you’d expect from a 90 year old Eastwood it almost slips into parody. It just shows an extremely grizzled and leathery Milo looking off into the middle distance. Copy on the one-sheet explains this is “A story of being lost…and found.”

We hear all about how great Milo once was on the rodeo circuit as the trailer, also released at the beginning of August, opens. After engaging in some barbs with his former boss, he accepts the job of going to Mexico to find Polk’s son. But Rafeal isn’t exactly eager to return. The journey the two embark on won’t be smooth, we see, but it will involve more than a few opportunities for both a discussion of what being “macho” means and examples of what being a man actually looks like. It’s short on story and long on sentimentality, honing in on the idea of Eastwood himself and his character looking back over a long life of ups and downs.

Things were relatively quiet for a while with the exception of CinemaCon at the end of August, where Warner Bros. included footage from the movie in its presentation to exhibitors and press.

Just in the last week or so leading up to release things picked back up, starting with a featurette about the legacy of Eastwood as a director along with an overview of the story.

Another interview with Eastwood had him again talking about getting older as well as the experience of riding a horse on screen for the first time since Unforgiven.

Another featurette continued focusing on Eastwood’s legacy and how that translates to this movie.

Even more explicit was a short video that looked specifically at Eastwood’s evolution as a director going back all the way to Play Misty For Me with interviews from many of the actors that have appeared in his films along with fellow directors like Spielberg, Scorsese and others.

overall

With a very much middling 50% on Rotten Tomatoes, the movie seems like it might benefit from getting the hybrid theatrical/streaming release even more than other titles. There’s not a lot here for anyone who doesn’t already have decades of appreciation for Eastwood and his work. In fact the vast majority of the marketing only gives the smallest amount of attention it reasonably can to the story or anything about the movie itself, instead almost wholly focused on making sure the audience knows what a legend Eastwood is, not why they should see this film specifically.

That may work and it may not, but it doesn’t seem likely there will be a lot of word of mouth that carries this along in the weeks following release.